Thursday, September 11, 2014

Tokyo Subway Metro Train Guide in Japan


For those who are traveling to Tokyo, Japan for the first time, you are definitely feeling nervous as you try to understand how to read the complicated subway map which connect 18 subway lines to each other. Initially, I had similar dilemma trying to understand the subway map but I didn't get the concept until we tried riding the subway train on the first day at Tokyo, Japan and somehow, we began to understand the connection of every different colour coded with a letter to represent the subway line while the number at the bottom of the letter shows the station number. Actually there are only five main subway companies which operate these 18 subway lines in Tokyo.

For instance, I am planning to take a subway train from Shinjuku station to Shibuya station. Shibuya station is located below of Shinjuku station in the map. There is no connection subway line directing from Shinjuku to Shibuya stations thus, I have to change the subway line during the journey. Firstly, I ride on M08 (Marunouchi Line) from Shinjuku station to Asakamitsuke (M13) station. Then I move and transfer to another subway line G05 (Ginza Line) from Asakamitsuke station to Shibuya station at G01. Since both Marunouchi and Ginza Lines are operating under Tokyo Metro Line thus, I don't have to buy an additional new ticket. However, if I change the subway line from Tokyo Metro to Toei Line then, I need to get new tickets as they are two different subway companies. Subway train tickets can be purchased at ticket kiosks at subway trains in Tokyo. All you do is to follow the instructions in English and press the button for assistance if you are having trouble. (Note: They will attend to your problem immediately by person or behind the machine kiosk.) 

Japan is well-known for proper etiquette. When you ride on escalator, please remember to follow Japanese Escalator Etiquette. When you are traveling at Tokyo and other parts of Japan, please stand and stay on the LEFT side of the escalator in order to give way to other users who are on the hurry to pass by. On the other hand, when you travel to Osaka, please stay and stand on the RIGHT side of the escalator in order to give way to other users to pass by. 

A complete of Tokyo subway train map in Japan
A complete of Tokyo subway train map in Japan
Five main subway train companies operating 18 lines in Tokyo, Japan
Five main subway train companies operating 18 lines in Tokyo, Japan
Different colour coded with a letter to represent every subway company followed by a number in an order to show the route of a train in Tokyo, Japan
Different colour coded with a letter to represent every subway company followed by a number in an order to show the route of a train in Tokyo, Japan
Check out the priority signs at subway stations in Japan before queuing as there are special lanes for elderly, pregnant women, mothers with children and for ladies
Check out the priority signs at subway stations in Japan before queuing as there are special lanes for elderly, pregnant women, mothers with children and for ladies
Japanese Escalator Etiquette is by standing on the left side in Tokyo while standing on the right side in Osaka in order to allow others passing by
Japanese Escalator Etiquette is by standing on the left side in Tokyo while standing on the right side in Osaka in order to allow others passing by in Japan

Alternatively, you can ride on the City Train or Yamanote Line (JR East Green Line) to explore some of the city's famous landmarks and attractions in Tokyo and helps to save your journey time from interchanging the subway lines. The Yamanote Line connects most of Tokyo's major stations and urban centers like, Tokyo Station, Akihabara, Ueno, Shinjuku, Harajuku, Shibuya, Ginza, Roppongi Hills, Ebisu and Ikebukuro. 

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(Source: GaijinPot via Youtube)

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